Workshop Summaries

  1. Integrating Adult in Practice
  2. Belonging
  3. Working Co-Creatively with Trauma – attention to the body level
  4. Co-Transferential Transactions – the past in the present
  5. Positive Games
  6. Contracting in CCTA
  7. Exploring Transference in a CCTA Framework
  8. The Implicit Relationship
  9. Working with Creative Methods in CCTA Contexts
  10. Living CCTA Principles
  11. What’s Love got to do with CCTA
  12. Transformation Learning and Change

1. Integrating Adult in Practice

We will together explore the differences between Tudor’s model of the dynamic integrating Adult and the Adult ego state proposed by Berne. Our curiosity is how using the Integrating Adult ego state model influences and changes the application of Transactional Analysis in practice. Our experience is that it opens up new and different possibilities of analyzing and understanding interpersonal transactions and inter-psychic processes. We are excited to share and discuss this with you.

2. Belonging

Belong or don’t belong? Your choice! Or is it? How do we decide who (or what or where) to belong to? Do we ever consciously decide? Or does it “just happen”? Or not?

This workshop will focus on, and explore, the unconscious processes at work, out of our awareness, that regulate our ability (and/or need) to belong to the people/groups that we encounter throughout our lifetime. Belonging can be challenging, especially if unconscious past experiences trigger defensive responses in us. These are often subtle. as well as rather familiar ways we have learned to use when faced with the complexity of belonging with others/groups/communities. Using the principles of Co-Creative TA we will be looking into ways to facilitate a more present centred stance in relation to our ability and readiness to belong.

We will share thoughts around contexts, frame of reference and present centred relating to reflect together on how we might understand belonging.

3. Working Co-Creatively with Trauma – attention to the body level

The therapist and the client steps into a brave space of “we-ness”. A space that allows us to find words for the unformulated and unsymbolized.

To find new meanings and narratives and to acknowledge body sensations.

 The healing is in the relationship. We, as therapists, have to be willing to enter into an “I and You” = We, subject to subject, relationship.

In this workshop Bev and Berit share their experiences of working with trauma in a CCTA perspective.

4. Co-Transferential Transactions – the past in the present

In Co-Creative Relational TA all responses, impulses, reactions are a source of shared interest and focus. The thinking here is that it is possible for us all to think about regressive states of the self as they happen, in the present moment, and to get interested in them. ‘These shifts in experience of self remain discernible and usable within an intersubjective and post-modern frame of reference.’ (Tudor and Summers, 2010, p19) In CCTA therapist and client do this working out together.

Join us to explore the use of the CCTA co-transferential relating ‘diamond’ model which gives us a useful way to map three modes of relating that happen in any encounter:

  • Present-centred Adult -Adult
  • Past-centred co-transferential relating
  • The stepping stones of ‘partial transferential transactions

This model helps break down the process of relating, with analysis of co-transferences bringing familiar transferential themes into awareness, Adult – Adult relating allowing fresh configurations and meanings to emerge, and the partial transference processes showing the potential to bridge between those two.

5. Positive Games

In this workshop we will explore how the psychosanological approach of co-creative TA provides the facility for Games (and Rackets) to support healthy transactions that are on Choy’s winners triangle, as well as transactions on Karpman’s drama triangle. The co-creative nature of our Script ensures that our script beliefs support both healthy (positive) and defensive aspects of our Frame of Reference or, as Berne described it, the constructive or destructive aspects of our Script

We will explore how we can use this re-framing of Game theory to support healthier and more non-defensive, present centred transactions to generate the intimacy facilitated, invited and accessed within the co-creative relation field generated through present centredness, we-ness, shared responsibility and positive regard.

6. Contracting in CCTA

In this session we will explore the key concept of contracting from a co-creative perspective and the implications this has in our day to day practice and living. We will be looking together how the four principles of CCTA influence the dynamic process of contracting and how it shapes our understanding of shared responsibility and we-ness, and invites people into the intersubjective space. We will then explore how these ideas can be used in therapy, supervision, the learning environment and the organisational environment.

7. Exploring Transference in a CCTA Framework

The Relational approach to TA is associated with Hargaden and Sills and their theoretical ideas and rooted in the psychodynamic tradition. In this approach working ‘with the transference’ is central, and involves the therapist monitoring her experience of what the client projects or invites, what this invokes – her countertransference – and using this information to inform her of the client’s state of mind and hence how to intervene. Interpretation, by the therapist of the client’s communication, encoded in the transference, is key. The therapist decides what might be going on, and when and how to intervene, and may share little of her thinking on this process with the client.

What happens in the transferential domain, which is part of the relational field, when we are working in a co-creative frame or inviting this, with our client, coachee, supervisee, learning or therapy group?

How do the variables of we-ness, present centred relating, shared responsibility, holding our integrating Adult with unconditional positive regard for self and other, present alternative ways of working with transferences?

8. The Implicit Relationship

In this session we will explore the practical importance of the implicit relationship and our open curiosity around this relationship. This opens the way to enable us to reflect on non-conscious and conscious learning in any context. We will explore dynamic ego states and how distinguishing the non-conscious processes from unconscious processes can help us reflect on the difference between defensive and non-defensive relating. We will then explore how these ideas can be used in therapy, supervision, the learning environment and the organisational environment.

9. Working with Creative Methods in CCTA Contexts

Understanding ourselves and making (new) meaning is essential in the development of our personality. In TA psychotherapy and counselling we as professionals engage in a relationship and conversation with our clients and thus initially invite them into their cognitive competence. Very often the answers to the questions that clients bring or that arise in the conversation are not very easily accessible by thinking and speaking about them. In this workshop we invite you to play with some creative methods – e.g. working with images – that support accessing the subconscious level of meaning making and link what we offer to models of co-creative TA.

10. Living CCTA Principles

We invite you to step into a space of curiosity, and explore the difficulties and challenges connected to living the CCTA principles.

To what extent are we aware of these difficulties? How do we overcome the resistance that may occur?

Let´s share our experiences and see if we can find a deeper understanding!

11. What’s Love got to do with CCTA

Love matters. Without love, the values and principles of CCTA cannot be applied.

We invite you to together explore the truths in this statement and reflect from a meta perspective on your experiences and findings throughout our conference and elsewhere. Where have you dared to take the risk of being seen, or even loved? How were you met when you were visible with a spot of vulnerability? How did you meet others in theirs? And what’s love got to do with it?
We would like to further investigate the meaning of co-regulation and interdependency along these questions and the ones you might bring.  

12. Transformation Learning and Change – Learning

Learning was, and is, key to our survival and development.  So why do we often resist learning, or find it difficult to learn?

When we learned how to learn, we had little, if any, power, so we learned how to get our needs met and to meet our Hungers, for contact, recognition, structure, etc., by adapting to our environment  Now we are adults with our own power, our long established patterns of learning, and unconscious Script beliefs about ourselves as learners can get in the way of our learning process, which inhibits our development and autonomy. 

We invite you to explore learning from a CCTA perspective, as an adult learner with the power to decide what to learn, how to learn, who to learn from and how to integrate that learning experience, and its outcome, into your own narrative.

Learning is the key to transformation! Come and transform with us!